4 Key Ways To Boost Focus And Concentration

“I think I have ADHD.” Blaming your lack of focus and concentration on actual conditions people suffer from is not the way to go. While it’s not completely far-fetched to assume you may actually be suffering from a mental issue given your inability to focus in stressful situations or concentrate during a business meeting, there are some things you could change in your daily life that could potentially improve your concentration. So refrain from calling your doctor about ADHD just yet and try these tricks first, because it’s unlikely that you belong to the 4.5 percent of adults who have the condition.

While your brain is not exactly composed of muscle tissue, you could think of the mind as a muscle and through active training, you can strengthen its functionality, specifically when it comes to focus and concentration. The exercises, tricks, and lifestyle alterations listed below are great methods by which you can improve your concentration and focus and a daily and long-term basis.

1. Meditation

No, it’s not only for hipsters and Buddhists, meditation is something that everyone can take part in and for good reason too. Mindful meditation has been shown repeatedly to strengthen mental capacities and increase your attention span.

One study showed that 140 participants saw a significant increase in their attention span after just eight weeks of mindful meditation training. What’s more, you don’t have to devote a lifetime to this activity to see its benefits, after just four days of 10 to 20 minute meditation throughout the day you can improve your concentration to a great extent.

Mindfulness is something you can also practice throughout the day to help with not getting distracted. For instance, when you’re eating you can make it an active experience versus a passive activity, such as eating while watching television.

Concentrate on your chewing and experience all the flavors and textures. This sort of conscious thinking will lead it being less likely that you get easily distracted. Think in the now and be present when you feel yourself becoming occupied with other tasks.

2. Make a List

Everyone’s probably hear this one already, but it works, seriously. Increasing your ability to focus can be much influenced by something as simple as making a list of the things you have to do. Director of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Training Program at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, Simon Rego, PsyD suggests composing a list prioritizing the important tasks first then creating a serape less urgent list.

Creating a list will not only prioritize your activities and deadlines but will prevent you from multitasking. Research time and time again has proven that despite our beliefs most people cannot multitask.

We are only able to tackle one issue at a time and trying to do multiple things at once will only decrease the value of work for each task and lead to you being easily distracted. Stay focused and concentrate on the first thing on your list.

3. Wiggle Your Feet

Ok this one sounds weird but it works and it’s one of the things Olivia Fox Cabane, author of The Charisma Myth suggests doing. Cabane suggests that we can often tune out during a conversation or become completely distracted during something important.

We look for an instant gratification and distraction like a new email or text. Cabane suggests that to avoid such instances take a moment and mind -fully concentrate on your toes, wiggling them around. When you’re done, you will be able to handle some of your tasks with better focus.

4. Limit Distractions

It’s not just the emails and texts that can be the cause for your inability to focus, other small distraction limit attention span, so it’s important to seclude yourself from these diversions.

Our inability to disconnect from easily available tools like the internet, computers, and smart phones can be the main cause of our lacking attention capacities. Author Mel Robbins suggests leaving the phone out of the room and when you feel yourself getting distracted or unable to concentrate and start something just count to five and launch right into whatever it is you’re doing.

50 tips for ultimate Brain Health Bonus Report

It’s that simple. Close the computer, leave the phone somewhere else, meditate in the morning, wiggle those toes, and get to work.

Get the Simple Steps To Better Memory, Focus and Concentration…”
Holistic Brain Health

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Mindful Meditation for Brain Health

Meditation is a form of alternative medicine that has been associated with a number of benefits, specifically to the individual’s mental health, such as decreased stress levels and improved mood. Mindfulness, in particular, is a form of meditation that involves intense concentration and focus on the present.

Mindful meditation requires awareness of one’s thoughts and actions in the present, putting aside all thoughts of the past and the future.

Meditation In Holistic Care

No matter who you are, or the stresses you have in your life, mediation is a sure-fire way to improve wellbeing. Those who mediate will attest to its powers and mediation masters can literally detach themselves from any type of chaos and outside noise by simply going into their minds and a meditative state.

Enlightenment is often experienced by those who mediate and is it brings them close to their internal feelings and who they are.

In holistic medicine, meditation is often used to treat those with anxiety, depression, and stress. It can help relax, calm and give a truly 100% natural and effective treatment method that has many health benefits.

Here are some key points to remember when performing mindful meditation:

• Be aware of your own breathing pay attention to the sensation of air entering your nostrils and leaving your mouth, and the rise and fall of your belly.
• Let each thought come and go, without suppressing or ignoring each of them. Stay calm and focus on your breathing.
• If you get distracted, simply follow your thoughts without being too hard on yourself.

Mindful Meditation Evidenced-Based Study

A recent study published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences” online journal suggested that a few hours of mindful meditation or integrative body-mind training can help improve mood, self-control, and response to stress.

The study, which was published on June 11, 2012, involved 68 undergraduates from the Dalian University of Technology in China. The students were divided into relaxation training and meditation training groups. Each of the group underwent either a 30-minute relaxation training or integrative body-mind training over a period of two weeks, totaling 5 hours of training for each group.

Researchers of this study have found changes in the brain’s “white matter”- a part of the brain’s anterior cingulate cortex after performing mindful meditation after just a short period. These changes weren’t observed in the brains of those who underwent relaxation training. None of the participants from both groups had any previous meditation training experience.

A non-invasive, MRI-based technology known as diffusion tensor imaging was used to see the white matter in the brains of the students, together with other imaging technology that measures the white matter’s ability to adapt and change.

The researchers focused on certain areas of the brain that were most susceptible to these physical changes, and measured these areas before and after mindful meditation training.

The white matter is an area in the brain that affects how it learns, and coordinates and relays information among the various brain regions. According to the authors, understanding the white matter with training, learning, and human development can potentially prevent various mental conditions such as anxiety, ADHD, depression, borderline personality disorder, schizophrenia, and even addiction, disorders that all involved the anterior cingulate cortex of the brain.

The most common problem with meditation, just like with any other alternative form of medicine is that scientific evidence is often lacking.

People who have practiced meditation may have been “conditioned” to feel positive about the therapy, and thus have responded favorably to the training.

This study, however, offers a quantifiable result that is actually based on scientific evidence. Because the real structural changes that the brain went through were observed and measured, this discovery study opens up a number of new possibilities in the world of alternative medicine.

 

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